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Boost your life and career with the best book summaries.

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Boost your life and career with the best book summaries.

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Top Psychology Books

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Psychology is one of the most interesting scientific disciplines. If you’re wondering why, please spend a moment thinking about one of Oliver Sacks’ opinions: the human brain is the “most incredible thing in the universe.”

Well, psychologists study it. And whether from a sociological, behavioral, or biological perspective, they have come across some brilliant findings.

We’ve spend some time choosing the best of the best psychology books ever!

And here they are!

#1. “Civilization and Its Discontents” by Sigmund Freud

Civilization and Its Discontents SummaryLet’s be honest: Sigmund Freud is a bit outdated. So much so, in fact, that he has become the butt of many “yo mamma” jokes. (Really, can you go lower than that?)

But, let’s not kid each other: Freud is not merely the father of modern psychology, but also so big that, even if you haven’t read any of his books, you already know many of his ideas.

And, really, we could have chosen basically any book by Freud, and we wouldn’t have made a mistake. We opted for “Civilization and Its Discontent” mainly because it’s his most relevant and least challenged.

In it, Freud claims that civilization and culture are built upon forfeited individual desires. And that there’s no other way. So, if you want to be happy and fulfilled, you’ll have to find some other way.

#2. “Man and His Symbols” by Carl Jung

Man and His Symbols SummaryPsychology was barely instituted, when it happened upon its first (and greatest) schism. Sigmund Freud saw in Carl Gustav Jung a potential heir, but Jung grew to become his intellectual nemesis.

A great thing – both for the sake of humanity and for the sake of science. After all, there’s no progress in conformity.

Anyway, Jung was a charismatic person. And in 1959 he gave a 40-minute interview for BBC’s John Freeman, which made him somewhat of a name among the general public. And yet, his complex books were inaccessible to it.

So, he decided to write “Man and His Symbols,” his last and simplest book. More importantly, his only book specifically written for the laymen.

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