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Thoughts Without a Thinker Summary

6 min read ⌚ 

Thoughts Without a Thinker Summary

Psychotherapy from a Buddhist Perspective

The Ancient Greeks had a saying: “wisdom arises from suffering.” Unlike them who debated its veracity, about the same time far on the East, Gautama Buddha was convinced that, behind it, a great truth about man’s existence lies hidden.

So, he made this saying the key tenant of his personal philosophy.

Two and half millennia later, his followers, modern Zen Buddhist experts, and prominent neuroscientists say that he was onto something.

In “Thoughts Without a Thinker,” Mark Epstein, a renowned psychotherapist, has his say on the subject.

And, once again, we’ve prepared a neat summary for you.

Who Should Read “Thoughts Without a Thinker”? And Why?

“Thoughts Without a Thinker” is a psychoanalytical book about pain and suffering, so people suffering from anxiety and depression may find reading it a soothing and enlightening experience. In fact, since our world is a world of unhappiness, even those who are merely sad may find more than one reason to enjoy this book.

In addition, people interested in Buddhism will certainly like to find out how a modern psychoanalyst of prominence reads Buddha’s messages thousands of years after they were uttered.

About Mark Epstein

Mark EpsteinMark Epstein is an American psychoanalyst whose two main focuses of attention are trauma and Buddhism. Consequently, most of his books concentrate on combining the worldviews of Buddha and Sigmund Freud, resulting in a series of books popular both in the religious and the popular science community.

In addition to “Thoughts Without a Thinker,” he is most famous for “The Trauma of Everyday Life,” and “Going to Pieces without Falling Apart: A Buddhist Perspective on Wholeness.” His most recent book is “Advice Not Given.” You can reach him at his website: http://markepsteinmd.com/.

Thoughts Without a Thinker Summary

Sigmund Freud was interested in many things. He wasn’t, however, interested in Buddhism!

Yet, as Mark Epstein shows, when it comes to Truth, the paths may be many, but the truth will always be the same. In other words, even though Freud knew nothing of Buddha, he discovered some things eerily similar to the ones the Indian prophesied.

For example, Buddha believed that we can’t understand ourselves because of three things: desire, anger, and delusion. Represented by a snake, a rooster, and a black hog biting each other’s tales in Buddhism’s “Wheel of Life,” these three feelings are problematic for Freud as well.

He just named them differently.

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