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Boost your life and career with the best book summaries.

Start growing!

Boost your life and career with the best book summaries.

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The Lean Startup Summary

12 min read ⌚ 


RE-INNOVATING  STARTUP / THE LEAN STARTUP

“Lean Startup: the application of lean thinking to the process of innovation.”


This is where Eric Ries‘s The Lean Startup: comes in. The underlying message of this books is clear: failures can be prevented!

If you want to find out how you’ll have to read the book. The Lean Startup was written for all kinds of entrepreneurs and offers meaningful clues about how you should constantly improve and test your vision. It also offers meaningful ways to adapt and adjust yourself to changes before it’s too late.

Until you start reading the book, you should check out some of our favorite nuggets from it below. These first visual steps will definitely help you understand more about Eric Ries’ approach.

How Today’s Entrepreneurs Use Continuous Innovation to Create Radically Successful Businesses

The Importance of Vision

Every startup has a true north, a direction where it would like to go, which is directly associated with its vision.

You need to have a clear strategy that involves a business model, product plan, and a clear market understanding, including partners, competitors, and customers. The product sold by a startup is the end-result of this strategy and can – and should – always change to achieve the predetermined vision.

Eric refers to the great strategic turns of a startup as pivots. The vision almost never changes, but most companies fail because they are unable to execute and put this vision into practice. A startup is a human organization designed to create a new product or service in an environment of extreme uncertainty. Therefore it is necessary to experiment and learn quickly.

“The Lean Startup Summary”

The Importance of Validated Learning

It is natural for people to say they learned a lot during a project, or while starting something new, but for Eric, it takes more than just learning. It is necessary to constantly validate the learnings and check if it still remains true.

Your true goal is not the learning itself, but the validation of it. Validation comes through simplifying and proving that you are solving a problem that people have. You need to focus on what customers really need and eliminate everything else.

In IMVU, his startup, Eric worked developing a 3D virtual world and plugins for chat tools in 2004. During the company’s initial testing phase, in conversations with users and observing their behaviors, he found that consumers did not want – nor did they know – how to install the plugins in their chat software.

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