12min
logo 12min

Start growing!

Boost your life and career with the best book summaries.

Start growing!

Boost your life and career with the best book summaries.

logo 12min

True Enough Summary

6 min read ⌚ 

True Enough Summary

Learning to Live in a Post-Fact Society

Even if you don’t know who Kellyanne Conway is (now you’re one click away from finding out), you’ve probably heard the most famous phrase she has coined: “alternative facts.”

We all laughed! Twitter had a ball with it! And newspapers promptly described the phrase as Orwellian, leading up to an almost 10,000% sales increase of Orwell’s dystopian book, “1984”!

But, this is where it got ugly:

Some were right to point out that newspapers shouldn’t get a say in the matter! It was their fault all along – they’ve fed us with fake news for years now!

Farhad Manjoo is in the business long enough to know these things. “True Enough” is his attempt to separate the facts from the fiction.

The conventional facts.

Who Should Read “True Enough”? And Why?

There are few things more important nowadays than learning to tell what is wrong from what is right. Because you can’t take even books concerned with your health at their word. It’s all marketing: if you advertise a lie as truth, it’s bound to become a fact after a while. (Remember that scene: this is the West, sir…)

Fortunately, we don’t need to falsely advertise “True Enough.” It’s a book that’s bound to be tempting for anyone. Media students and sociologists should especially have a go.

About Farhad Manjoo

Farhad ManjooFarhad Manjoo is an American journalist. He was born in South Africa, but his family moved to Southern California when he was eight years old. A Cornell graduate, he got a job as a “Slate” staff writer in 2008.

Five years later, he joined “The Wall Street Journal,” and in 2014 he became the “State of the Art” columnist for “The New York Times.”

“True Enough” is his first and, so far, the only book.

True Enough Summary

Here’s an interesting fact:

Before the digital revolution, when media was “one TV and few radio channels,” people faced fewer problems discerning the truth. Nowadays, in the age of the internet, hardly anyone knows what is true and what is false.

Scroll to Top